Sophomore Seminar

Similar to freshman year when all freshmen have to take their Chicago Quarter class (either Discover Chicago or Explore Chicago), each sophomore has to take a Multiculturalism Seminar. These have different concentrations similar to Discover Chicago but the theme of multiculturalism runs throughout the course.

I am currently enrolled in the Multiculturalism of Democracy. This class reviews America's political and social history in regards to race, sex, gender, sexual identity, and other similar identities. The course description of this class is "This course explores the conceptual, theoretical and practical nexus of Multiculturalism and Democracy using weekly reading and writing assignments. Upon completion of this course, students will have a familiarity with the issues involved and be able to articulate their own coherent position regarding multiculturalism in the United States."
This discussion intensive course situates American multiculturalism and democracy in a global context. 
While focusing on the United States, the course moves beyond the American experience and seeks to 
draw comparisons to other societies when appropriate. We will start by focusing on ethnicity, race, 
class, gender, language, and religion in the US and then move to “culture wars” in contemporary times. 
Students will be required to engage in Socratic dialogue and write well in order to do well in the course. 
This discussion intensive course situates American multiculturalism and democracy in a global context. 
While focusing on the United States, the course moves beyond the American experience and seeks to 
draw comparisons to other societies when appropriate. We will start by focusing on ethnicity, race, 
class, gender, language, and religion in the US and then move to “culture wars” in contemporary times. 
Students will be required to engage in Socratic dialogue and write well in order to do well in the course. 
This discussion intensive course situates American multiculturalism and democracy in a global context. 
While focusing on the United States, the course moves beyond the American experience and seeks to 
draw comparisons to other societies when appropriate. We will start by focusing on ethnicity, race, 
class, gender, language, and religion in the US and then move to “culture wars” in contemporary times. 
Students will be required to engage in Socratic dialogue and write well in order to do well in the course. 
This class really expands the mind to reflect on what America is really built on and, in my opinion, is a unique aspect of the education that only DePaul offers.

This course is a required course for all students at DePaul. So even if you're majoring in biology or something totally opposite of multiculturalism, you will attain this type of thinking through the class. I am grateful for this as well, because I don't think I would've taken a course like this if it were up to me.

You can view some of the courses and their descriptions here!

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